Caring for Our Kids and Our World: First Mennonite Goes Solar

Sometimes I feel trapped, concerned, frustrated and angry about the state of our country’s woefully inadequate response to the massive threat of climate change to our peace, our livelihoods, the beauty that comes with a diverse biosphere and our kids’ – my kids’ – future.   We have the tools we need to meet this challenge many times over; we just lack the collective will.  I care about many issues, but this one probably keeps me up at night the most.  So, I find I need an outlet for all this pent-up negative energy, and I think that is what first made me think about solar at FMC. 

The Creation Care Crew (CCC) met for its first meeting in the spring of 2019.  Marie Harnish, John Marquis, Randy and Ellen Stoesz, Rhonda Talbott, and Bob and Emilie Walson and I came together because we all care about creation care and how our church interacts with this issue.  We first focused our efforts on making recycling easier at church, in addition to reviewing a lot of great creation care work that had already been done at FMC.  But even at our first meeting we discussed the idea of going solar. 

When I first raised the possibility of solar, I have to say, I didn’t think it would go anywhere.  I thought it would be too expensive; there was too much else going on… it just seemed too big.  But why not dream?  Members of the Creation Care Crew wanted to explore it. 

So, we did. John Marquis sought out quotes from different solar installers, and we held several meetings to learn more about other congregations’ efforts with solar.  We explored funding, and learned a lot about the technicalities and benefits related to solar.  After this research, and creating numerous opportunities to share information and get feedback from the congregation, we made the decision to move forward and test the waters with fundraising. 

The response we received was tremendous.  First, all of the members of the CCC pledged contributions that were significant to their own circumstances. Then we began approaching folks within the congregation.  Again, when we started, I didn’t think it was likely that we would be able to raise the full amount to install solar, but as pledge after pledge came in, at levels that clearly showed strong support for funding this project, it gradually became apparent that we were going to reach our goal of nearly $100,000 in pledges.  This fundraising period lasted only about five months.  I remain amazed at the level of support we received and how quickly the funds were received!

The Creation Care Crew collectively care a lot about the issue of climate change, and we turned that caring into leadership and action.  It was by sharing our energy through this leadership that we tapped into the care that others held for this issue as well.  Then we shared in the effort to raise the resources needed to make what started as a dream a reality. 

The panels aren’t on the roof yet, as the permitting process has been slowed due to Covid-19.  But we are well on our way, and we look forward to sharing in a celebration of converting to clean, renewable solar power at First Mennonite Church in the near future.


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A Prayer in COVID Time

Lament is in the forefront of these days, O GOD, lean down and hear our cries:

It’s not just the trips we’ve had to cancel, but also the visits with loved ones that still can’t happen.

It’s not just the uncertainty of how long this isolation will go on, but also not knowing what will ever be again?

It’s not just the jobs and money that’s been lost, but also the friends and family this virus has stolen from us.

It’s not just the havoc of arranging childcare with everyone’s schedules askew, but also the lack of emotional energy needed to cope.

It is not just our current loneliness, depression and gloom but also, a winter that looks confining, dark and endless.

We no longer hear the songs arising from each other’s liberated hearts. 

We can’t hold one another in our arms, until the pain subsides.

We don’t visit over coffee with the friends we miss so much.

And so, we grieve. We ache. We wait. And we wonder…

How long, O LORD, will You forget us forever?

And yet, when we are very still, we know you are as close as breath,

and every day we walk in your handiwork.

We know our suffering here is miniscule when compared to those who have no access to medical care, no food in the cupboard, and little reason to hope for the coming of a new day.

So, come and sit with us here, Gracious One,

Still our fretting minds. 

Steady our anxious hands.

Soothe our angry spirits.

Heal our doubting hearts.

And remind us, O GOD, that nothing, not even COVID,

can separate us from your magnanimous love.      AMEN.

Winter Valley [cm]

Could We Call Them Holy Days?

Sometimes when we stuff our turkeys or put up the Christmas tree, we forget that holidays are not just about our loved ones gathering and the family coming home for dinner.

Holidays are, in fact, intended to be HOLY DAYS.  And while this year, many will not experience the traditional gatherings (and we will indeed miss them), can we not still experience HOLY DAYS… 

Days of remembering WHOSE we are and WHY we are here,

Days of doing something that addresses needs in our community,

Days of being still and knowing that GOD is GOD?

When our traditional holidays look more like fasting than feasting, maybe we can see that lack as a challenge to reach deeper than our emptiness. We may not experience a holy, jolly Christmas this year. 

It never is when we are grieving.

Still, in this frigid winter of our isolation, we are invited into the PRESENCE that accompanies us, even in COVID time -especially in COVID time. And maybe, just maybe, we can call them HOLY DAYS this year.

— Bob and Mag


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COVID-19 Holidays

January of 2020, the Liechty extended family began making plans to have a Christmas Holiday extravaganza, of sorts, for the upcoming December.  We had time to plan; the grandparents were in their 90s, but healthy.  This was THE time to get everyone who could possibly make the trip “Back Home in(to) Indiana”!  All of our children were going to try to get here, whatever the barriers!  A family photo would be taken!  We could fill rows at the church as we attended a service with the grandparents!

Best made plans, right?  Covid-19 and illness have intervened.  Many of us still have our reservations at the hotel we planned to occupy.  We’re reluctant to give up all hope until the last possible cancellation date, even though we recognize it’s not going to happen. Discussions are presently ongoing as we try to re-imagine the holiday. 

No doubt this is true for many families.  Some will get together with no precautions in defiance of the virus that has taken so much already.  Others will test, keep distance or maybe do some zooming.  Since our family presently has Covid-19 in one sibling branch, and Grandma is now dealing with a significant medical issue, we can’t avoid the obvious risks.  What are our options?

We’ve discussed a “game day” online.  Apparently, this is possible; my sister plays Mahjong with a group every week.  Maybe we could have a meal together (though apart) and share our food creations?  Could we do a family photo from a zoom call?  Or could we create a family pic by sharing each person or family pod from a specific day?  Should we be masked as a memory of the year, or not be masked in that picture?  Can we still have “whiskey night” and share our favorite new discoveries through verbal description?  Hmmm.  There are many questions.

Nothing is the same as being together, giving hugs, sharing impromptu stories and memories, food, and getting to know the newest “littles” in the mix.  We will come up with some hybrid.  For us, there is no choice. 

What are you doing to acknowledge traditions and plans for the holidays this year?  How are you reimagining the plans you had made? Perhaps we could share some creative thoughts.  I asked several people what they had considered, and most said they hadn’t thought about it yet.  Others were prompted to start thinking things through.  The FMC Faith Formation page has encouraged people to write some ideas as well. 

Deb and Robin Helmuth adjusted their Thanksgiving Day plans when the pandemic worsened. A rearranged morning schedule included taking and sharing an eat-in-the-garage breakfast for a single friend with no local family, and switching to separate, virtual modes for the annual Drumstick Dash race. Their area family decided not to eat all together indoors, though they would see each other briefly—wearing masks– and share food. As Deb explained, “It really boils down to the fact that these holidays are calling all of us to share our love and care for others in the safest ways we can. We don’t want to have regrets.”

Pastors Bob and Mag Smith are entertaining some in-person time with a small portion of the family only after testing and several isolation days.  This is one way a recent “All Things Considered” piece offered as a means to reduce risk. Suggestions in that segment also included:

  1. Driving to your destination and taking your own food in the car.  Flying is fairly safe, but airports are not.  Try to put in isolation time at an Airbnb for a week after your arrival.  If your trip is very short, it might not be worth it. 
  2. If you have a college student coming home, check the dashboard for that school and find out what kind of infection rates exist. Ask if the school will be doing exit testing, and if they don’t, have the student test anyway and consider some isolation time after a student returns as well as a coronavirus re-test.

But the best suggestions were some my SURJ (Showing Up for Racial Justice) group has talked about as we try to finish up our in-person SURJ work this year:  BUY A GREAT PARKA!  Learn to be Scandinavian.  Deal with the cold and stay outside as much as you can.  Make a fire or get an outdoor heater. 

There ARE ways to mitigate risk.  There is no perfect way.  Decisions will have to be made.  Remember Deb Helmuth’s mantra:  No Regrets!

P.S.  We’re all tired of Covid-19.  If you need motivation to consider precautions, look up some of the recent stories in the NYTimes or the Washington Post of families who loosened up because “It was just family”.  Or check out the CNN response to the President’s recent criticism of their Covid-19 coverage.  It’s powerful.  


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Sunday Services are Virtual through 2020

For the safety of all, the Trustees have made a decision to cancel in-person services through the rest of 2020.  Please contact email hidden; JavaScript is required if you would like a link to join our Sunday morning virtual services and/or to receive our weekly Newsletter. Services start at 9:30 am every Sunday and we would love to see you there!  All are welcome!

“I’ve Got This!” – Or So I Thought

When Indiana shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic, I approached the “stay at home” orders with a healthy mixture of anxiety and confidence. Buoyed up by messages of hope and perseverance, like from Carrie Newcomer who made her song “You Can Do This Hard Thing” a mantra for our collective survival, I felt a sense of connection and hopefulness as I entered the pandemic-imposed isolation.  

It also helped that for Lent I had decided to dedicate some time each day to practicing mindfulness. Little did I know how significant that focus on being present in the moment would become in just a few weeks.  

My mindfulness prompt on March 17, just a couple of days after IUPUI closed down the campus, was:  

“An ancient Chinese proverb says:  ‘You cannot stop the birds of sorrow from flying over your head, but you can stop them nesting in your hair.’  Think about what this phrase means about being mindful.  Write a poem or draw a picture that captures your thoughts about the phrase.”  

Now, that was a challenge for someone who doesn’t consider herself to be much of a poet and even less of an artist!  Nonetheless, I set out on my evening walk, thinking about COVID-19 as a huge flock of “birds of sorrow” flying overhead and contemplating what it would take to keep them from “making a nest in my hair.”  As words starting popping into my mind – communication, compassion, open-mindedness, determination — it occurred to me that the letters that make up COVID itself just might give us all the answers we need.  When I got back from my walk, I created this “Not-in-My-Hair” shield.

The shield reinforced my feelings of hopefulness – it gave me confidence that it just might be possible to turn what has been lost into new life and to transform despair and fear into new beginnings.  

Here we are, four months later, and I am no longer as convinced that “I’ve Got This.”  I find myself feeling stressed by the resurgence of COVID-19 cases, irritated by what I see as irresponsible and risky choices that are being made by individuals as well as institutions, and trapped by travel restrictions. 

Then a thought occurs to me.  Maybe, just maybe, that “Not-in-My-Hair” shield might have the answers needed to get through the current situation, too; so, I pull out my Lenten journal, flip to March 17, and take another look at my “work of art.”   

  • Creative solutions and Compassion definitely are still needed.  
  • Open-mindedness and Organization certainly can’t hurt.  
  • Virtual communication continues to be my lifeline.  
  • Interdependence – recognizing that what each of us does affects everyone else – is critical right now.  (And, for myself, I could definitely add another “I” word: Imperturbability, being able to stay calm and avoid becoming upset or agitated.) 
  • Determination and Deep Faith come together to give us the roots we need to stand firm and the wings we need to fly. 

I’m still not sure “I’ve Got This,” but it’s good to be reminded of what can keep the “birds of sorrow” from nesting in my hair. 

Tiny Cottage by Bethany Habegger

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My Struggle with COVID-19

My ordeal with COVID-19 began this spring around the middle of April, waking up on a Monday morning with aches and pains I wasn’t used to. With body aches, headaches, and extreme fatigue, I slept for quite a few days. Then the symptoms began to get worse. When my fever rose to 100, I called my doctor for suggestions. She advised I begin a 14-day isolation period; so, my sojourn in the bedroom continued! 

The fatigue stayed extreme; I could sleep for hours on end. While headaches are not my usual thing, they managed to stick around for a week. I monitored my temperature carefully. When during the second week, my temp got to 100, I called the doctor again. Her advice was to go to the ER if temps hit 102 or if I had breathing difficulties. At that point, I got scared! I remember telling Lu that would mean a hospital stay, and I didn’t want that. Being in a high-risk category with diabetes and heart issues, I was indeed fearful! Following Chris Cuomo’s advice, I started deep breathing exercises five to six times a day. I repeat, I didn’t want to go to the ER!

Armed with a mask and gloves, Lu brought me good meals. She and her trusty Clorox spray kept the bathroom and doorknobs sanitized! Our son, David, hooked me up with a TV in the bedroom. Between sleeping, reading, and TV, I managed to stay isolated for two weeks. Fortunately, respiratory problems never started. By day 10, I began to feel better except for the fatigue, which still hangs on.

After the quarantine, I lucked into a COVID testing study conducted by Marion County Health Department, in conjunction with IU School of Public Health. By then, I tested negative for COVID-19, but a blood test revealed I had developed antibodies for the virus. The research is a year-long project so I get tested monthly. The results in July showed the antibodies have now decreased some. So… Doc says, “Wear a mask, wash hands often, keep a distance until a vaccine comes along.” AND I’M LISTENING! 

Cement by Bethany Habegger

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Doing Church in a Pandemic

Singing in Church

Kalonda, Congo, 1981
Close together
wooden benches
children packed into the front rows
enthusiastically singing,
waving, clapping, dancing.

Indianapolis, 2019
Padded pews
space between us
modulated voices
harmony
children in the back
with distracted parents.

COVID, 2020
Computer screens
miles apart
children dart in and out of view
we mute ourselves when we sing.

Doing Church in a Pandemic

I’m used to sitting in the front row at Shalom Mennonite Church, seeing only the worship and song leaders and preachers up front. On Zoom I see rows of faces. I click back and forth to see who’s here. I am distracted by my own face and try to adjust the camera.

Preaching works fine on Zoom; fewer distractions on Speaker view. One or two persons read the litany while others follow along from home. Singing is the biggest challenge. We can each sing at home but can’t hear each other. I see what tech-savvy folks are doing in other locations (including Quito, Ecuador), but our congregation hasn’t gotten there yet.

Zoom is a great medium for folks with social anxiety. One can hide one’s face or turn the camera to the ceiling. Some folks have been attending who rarely or never could gear themselves up to come to an in-person service. Shy folks watch from behind their names. We are joined by folks who are at a distance, snowbirds and folks who have moved away.

For a person who doesn’t drive and doesn’t have internet, this is a terribly lonely time. No access to email, no friendly person picking one up on Sunday morning and chatting on the way to church, no fellowship meals. Listening to worship by phone is a poor substitute.

How to be church together in such a time?

Our Shalom leaders created a panel of deacons who check in on each person or household on a regular basis. A social calling tree is available to encourage informal conversations. Small groups meet by Zoom or stay in touch informally. We still take meals to folks who have had surgery or been hospitalized. 

Our sharing time takes on a new urgency when several members of one family are ill. Some of us work in health care or other high-risk settings. We pray for each other, virtually reaching out to surround each other with the hugs we can’t share.

Looking ahead, it’s not easy to find the best path. We feel the desire to draw together, while the rising Covid case numbers pull us apart. Will cases spike when school opens? When will it be safe enough to gather in person? How will we care for the most vulnerable among us?

There have been plagues and pandemics before, but in reading about them we underestimated the upheaval that they caused. Now it’s our turn to live in a pandemic. Lord help us, we pray.

Artwork by Maggie Girard

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Young Voices

Checking in with Our Youth

What was the coolest thing you did this summer?

The coolest thing was going down the water-slide in Michigan. I was scared, but did it anyways and had a good time.

Theo, Age 7

My favorite thing was going to Lake Tippecanoe in our camper and taking a friend.

Lyra, Age 9

This summer I liked going to Michigan—I was able to watch TV which was cool since we don’t have TV at home.

Simon, Age 10

I took a trip to Cataract Falls with my friend.

Klaine, Age 18

This fall, I’m looking forward to…

Christmas, and going down the slide into the leaf pile in our backyard.

Theo, Age 7

Getting a dishwasher.

Lyra, Age 9

Apple cider.

Simon, Age 10

Going to an apple orchard.

Klaine, Age 18

Describe how you’re feeling about school right now.

Angry about going back because I don’t like school, but looking forward to friends and gym.

Theo, Age 7

Annoyed and disappointed about not going back to school in person, but looking forward to seeing friends.

Simon, Age 10

Name 3 adjectives that describe how you’re feeling about school right now.

Good. Bad. Happy.Lyra, Age 9

Apprehensive. Confused. Bored.

Klaine, Age 18

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MennoExpressions Volume 33, No. 3 | Summer 2020

Articles in this Issue

Blended Pieces—A Patchwork for Today by Carol Mullet

“I’ve Got This!”—Or So I Thought by Beth Goering

Doing Church in a Pandemic by Martha Yoder Maust

Young Voices by Carla Schmid

A Laboratorian’s View, Narrow as it May Be by Robin Helmuth

My Struggle with COVID-19 by Del Culp 

Another Viewpoint by Lu Culp

When You Hear the Term: White Supremacy Culture by Mary Liechty

Yes, We’re the Church Together! by Emily Fox Ludden

Remembering Steven McLay by Gaynel Bryan


Art Contributors in this Issue

Maggie Girard spends her time with her preschool aged kids, and as a part-time art therapist with IU Health. She attends FMC, and grew up in Indianapolis, but has enjoyed living in Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Washington DC and Holland, MI before moving back to Indy.

 

Bethany Habegger is a senior at IU Bloomington and will be receiving her BFA in painting in the spring. She is currently selling prints in support of Black Lives Matter. If you are interested in supporting the cause, check out her Etsy here: etsy.com/shop/bethanyhabeggerart


MennoExpressions 2020

MennoExpressions is published four times a year in February, May, August, and November by First Mennonite Church, Indianapolis, IN, with a special graduation insert in May.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written consent from an editorial team member.

Editorial Team: Carl Rhine, Kenda Friend, Rachel Friesen Krall, Elizabeth Goering, Robin Helmuth, Mary Liechty, Carla Schmid, Lisa Habegger, Erwin Boschmann.

Associate Editor: Carol Mullet

Production: Elizabeth Marie Cooney, Jason Schmucker, Gaynel Bryan.

Long Term Past Editors: Erwin Boschmann (Founding Editor), Shari Wagner, Alison Schumacher.

All correspondence should be sent to First Mennonite Church at 4601 Knollton Rd. Indianapolis, IN 46228. Email: email hidden; JavaScript is required.

When You Hear The Term: White Supremacy Culture

Tema Okun, along with Kenneth Jones, are two individuals who have paved the way for us to understand the term “White Supremacy Culture” as it is presently used. This is also the name of a book by Okun. It’s a term that often leads to defensiveness among individuals of European heritage, i.e. “I’m not a white supremacist!” But it’s one that we, whatever the hue of our skin color, could learn much from, even if we bristle at it.

No – we are not Neo-Nazis; however, most of us grew up in a culture predominantly influenced by white people in power. It’s just a fact. These systems that were created with patterns and processes common in white culture also benefited the people who created those systems…white people. You are not a white supremacist just because you grew up in that culture. But if you are white, you have benefited from the system, because that is how it was designed—to make “us” comfortable.

Corporations, non-profit boards, schools and churches have all been influenced by white supremacy culture. The way we run meetings, the things we value in group work, the focus of the work—all are influenced by our experiences and training in white culture, whatever the ratio of melanin in our skin. Not all of that is bad, but when we don’t look at the pieces of that culture that can marginalize BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) individuals and shut down their voices, we are continuing the negative pieces of the pattern. 

So, what does white supremacy culture look like in an organization? Those, like Okun and Jones, who have studied this topic, have a list of traits that are common. Let me name a few that I have perpetrated, thinking I was just being a good leader: Urgency, Perfectionism, Either/Or thinking, Patronizing, Individualism valued over Group, and Avoidance of Discord.

  1. Urgency—Ask my husband, I have an issue with time. I want a meeting to start on time, everyone to BE there on time, everyone to have their limited time to speak, and all the points I’ve written in the agenda to be covered. Heck – I’m a ONE on the Enneagram! I value time management. But how often do I leave out good discussion and ideas because I’m rushing to get through the agenda? Who do I silence by moving ahead before someone else has really been able to form their thoughts or get the gumption to speak up? Do I listen less to the person who was late, because they were late? Do I give more time to the person whose ideas most closely reflect my own? Conversely, when I’m not in charge, how often have I felt I wasn’t given a chance to speak? Have I ever sensed that a leader of a group just wants to hear from certain people, like my opinion doesn’t matter? Chalk one up for Urgency, which cuts off voices and limits ideas. 
  2. Also chalk one up for Perfectionism. MY agenda, My meeting, completing MY tasks… check, check, check. Recognizing this doesn’t mean meetings shouldn’t have a time limit. It just asks us to be aware of the voices we are leaving out through our rigidity.
  3. I often go into a meeting thinking I might have an answer to an issue on the agenda. That in itself isn’t negative. There was a time in my life, however, when I was very proud to say that I had a knack for “constructive manipulation.” Because, of course, I had the BEST idea and I wanted others to SEE it was the best idea. This is a pretty common phenomenon for people in charge who grew up within white systems. It’s not that we shouldn’t bring our ideas, but it’s the investment in our ideas at the cost of other ideas that creates a problem. There’s an Either/Or way of thinking that blocks us from hearing other points of view. White supremacy culture tends to value ideas from white culture over BIPOC voices. I need to think more in terms of Both/And about new ideas instead of Either/Or
  4. I used to create health curriculum with a team. Some of that had to do with abusive relationships, dealing with violence, and various mental health perspectives. We made good curriculum that was mostly well received, and we always tried to get perspectives, ideas and feedback from people affected by these issues prior to launching. But even good curriculum can fall flat if we provide it to persons with cultural experiences we did not take into account. Talking about depression with a group of 14 and 15-year-olds who have witnessed unbelievable violence and know a level of sadness I can only imagine means switching gears entirely. Not including those affected by a situation as you try to remedy or address it, is Patronizing. Missionary history is rife with such stories.
  5. It should be abundantly clear in this age of COVID-19 that this country suffers from, what I term, “the wild west syndrome” or individualism over what’s best for the group. Our inability to control this virus is in part due to an irrational need to put personal desires over societal needs. This is also a white supremacy culture issue.
  6. A good issue for Mennonites is Avoidance of Discord. The past few years we’ve been forced to accept some discord in our congregation, but I will own that I have rushed through a discussion, or glossed over a topic, while praying no one brings up anything difficult. To make myself feel justified, I might say those folks are being divisive, and I’m just keeping the peace. Being unable to hear the pain or the anger of others minimizes what those persons feel. It then allows for those in charge to make the same mistakes over and over. 

These are just some of the ways I have participated in white supremacy culture. They support each other. For instance, I can’t hear your pain or your thought because the meeting is nearly over. Or if I truly consider your idea, it might derail my idea that is the BEST… etc. Sometimes the culture is very subtle, sometimes it’s overt. 

In the past four years I’ve taken a closer look at myself and at my patterns. I’ve tried to adjust how I lead or participate with an awareness of these and other aspects of my white culture. I become defensive, feel shamed, self chastise, then consider, ponder and try again. I make constant mistakes. Unlearning is a lot harder than learning. Unlearning doesn’t mean throwing out all my learned behaviors, but it does demand that I consider carefully whether what I’m valuing in my actions has genuine merit.

Our country is at yet another crossroads in understanding its history. This one is big. Many of you are on a deeper journey into recognition and ownership of the privilege that has been given to some over others during the creation of this country, and the effects that continue today. Some of you are reading like never before; others are joining SURJ (Showing Up for Racial Justice) groups; some are marching in support of Black Lives Matter. Some of you have joined Alicia Amazan online to tackle difficult subjects in regards to racism. Some of you are educating your children more earnestly about privilege and history.

It’s a big undertaking, and we are ALL late to the table. Until we understand how we participate in perpetuating racism, it’s hard to take needed action to change things. It’s difficult work, and it really has no end, but the results have the potential to enrich all of us.

Artwork by Maggie Girard

Resources

SURJ developed a learning curriculum which has involved a number of FMC individuals. The goal is to help white people develop an understanding of what we’ve perhaps missed in our formal education regarding race in the US, and also the things that hold us back from understanding what BIPOC persons deal with on a daily basis.  Another FMC group is being planned for the fall. Here is a link for the SURJ national website.

A short piece by Tema Okun with a concise explanation and examples of White Supremacy Culture:

An article on racism in white church bodies.

Alicia Amazan: Upon seeing people interested in learning and talking about racial injustice, my friend Chelsea and I sent out a call to have people join us on the journey. We wanted to provide a space to hold each other accountable, to keep learning when the media coverage loses momentum and we can slip back into the privilege of not seeing the injustices. We are passionate about learning and listening to Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and are intentional about pointing others to these voices that are speaking out and doing incredible work to create a more anti-racist society. We also acknowledge that as white people we need to teach each other and not rely on BIPOC to teach us, as that is not their job. Chelsea and I are providing space for people to relearn history, identify and learn about whiteness and systemic racism and work toward being anti-racist. We have over 100 people joining us from across the country in a variety of ways. Below are ways people can be involved. 

What is offered at Continue to Learn and Listen?

  • Bimonthly Newsletter: On the 5th and 20th of each month, we email a newsletter full of resources related to a specific topic. We hope that you can find a few resources to meet you where you are and challenge you to continue to grow!
  • Monthly Virtual Gathering: Once a month we will gather on Zoom to dig deeper into the same topic covered in the bimonthly newsletter. We will present information, have discussions, and continue learning together!
  • Me & White Supremacy Book Club: An online group that works through the book Me and White Supremacy by Layla F. Saad over the course of four meetings.

Join us by subscribing at http://eepurl.com/g59Bvn or emailing us at email hidden; JavaScript is required.

Black Lives Matter by Bethany Habegger

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